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change and the announcement of science deniers was lauded by the left. of course it had to be. let's listen to the president say something that i don't think has been said before. >> we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to the ourselves but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> well, rush limbaugh challenged him today because people were listening to rush are driving cars and using up fossil fuel and they're not driving smart cars or priuses. no, they're driving big gas burners, but the fact is there's still that sort of no-nothingism, if you will, that -- i'm trying to think of the great word. you don't believe in anything. ludd
with a science-type -- as somebody with a science-type background i took offense at that. i would challenge him to show us the linkage, the undeniable linkage between drought and change of weather and some kind of human activity. >> it's not like you're an m.i.t. graduate. oh, wait, you are. i think it was a message, not to congress but to whoever will be running the e.p.a. for the president. i don't see any of that language passing through the house and so it'll be via rule and reg, executive order potentially through the white house. the m.i.t. grad does bring up the science today as we sit on the 40th anniversary of roe v. wade, i find it amazing that the unmistakable scientific and biological evidence of the humanity of a -- an unborn child is denied by the white house while we have this debate over other science as well. >> clear think the administration likes to use regulatory agencies as a bludgeon to play to his constituencies. if the leadership wants to make sure i would vote for this debt ceiling increase, they could achieve the rains act to it, which my predecessor geoff davis got pa
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >>> hey, there, here's what's happening. algeria news anyonen si says an attempt to free hostages is over. it's unclear how many hostages were killed in the op raegs. boeing plans to keep producing 787 dream liners, even though the planes remain grounded by the f.a.a. due to concerns about their lithium batteries. and pauline phillips has died. she was 94 years old. back to "hardball." ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." even before president obama announced the nomination of chuck hagel to be se
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> well, what do you think about hardened criminals serving time behind bars, you probably don't think about knitting. but in one prison in maryland, two retirees are turning dozens of convicts into converts with the help of yarn, needles and the zen of the stitch. >> reporter: barbed wire fences, watchmen towers and a group of men with convictions. hardened criminals. this is no white-collar country club. >> i'm arrested for armed kidnapping. >> attempted murder. >> reporter: but listen a little closer. >> i love knitting. >> reporter: and you realize there's more here than meets the eye. >> i'm knitting a small hat for a kid. >> reporter: that softer side appears every thursday around dusk. with two unusual visitors to the pre-release unit in jessup, maryland. meet lynn and sheila. you wanted to give knitting needles to hardened criminals. is that a good idea? >> for a man to have picked up needles to walk through that door, to say come on,
. it comes with a big warning about the next big risk. here with that our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: the report out today illustrates huge strides in the fight against cancer which kills one in four americans. the death rate down more than 20% in the last two decades is attributed to improved survival from the biggest killers, lung and colon cancer, for both men and women. breast cancer in women and prostate cancer. >> the public should be ecstatic we are seeing these kind of reductions. but they need to realize the battle hasn't been won. >> reporter: experts emphasize the kind of death rate is not due to the expensive new drugs we hear about. instead they point to people smoking less and early detection, especially for breast and colon cancer. still, this year, an estimated 1.6 million americans will be diagnosed with cancer, and more than 580,000 will die from it. according to the report, the death rate for melanoma, often caused by sun exposure, is rising. and there is major concern about obesity, which affects many cancers, including liver, breast and colore
been a time of proud achievement. we have made enormous strides in science and industry and agriculture. we have shared our wealth more broadly than ever. we have learned at last to manage a modern economy to assure its continued growth. we have given freedom new reach. we have begun to make its promise real for black as well as for white. we see the hope of tomorrow in the youth of today. i know america's youth. i believe in them. we can be proud that they are better educated, more committed, more passionately driven by conscience than any generation in our history. no people has ever been so close to the achievement of a just and abundant society, or so possessed of the will to achieve it. and because our strengths are so great, we can afford to appraise our weaknesses with candor and to approach them with hope. standing in this same place a third of a century ago, franklin delano roosevelt addressed a nation ravaged by depression and gripped in fear. he could say in surveying the nation's troubles -- "they concern, thank god, only material things." our crisis today is in reverse. we
. this is the neuroscience that we know today, the brain science that we're getting today is irrefutable. this is a disease that centers in the brain. tip o'neil, they didn't have the science back then. >> what if only one gets hit by it? >> it's a tricky illness. there's one gene in your body that determines whether you're lactose intolerant. there's 20 genes that identify with the way alcohol is metabolized in your body. you just can't ignore the interplay between biology and environment. >> what about the fact that we talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it a lack of tolerance? is there a term for it? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, prevention. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it, you're permanently -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana? >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to weigh in here. so we need to be mindful, and not jump into this. >> like joe camel and
. this is not based in science. martha: here's another issue that comes up with the children, alan. if you live in a family that has guns, hunters or has guns for their own security, that is how you grew up, what is the message you're getting from president obama if your dad and your mom believe that safe gun ownership is, their second amendment right and something they should not be a shamed of? >> no one is saying that. we don't know what the president is going to say. that is different issue whether or not it is appropriate for children to be present. that is a very separate issue. i don't believe the president's ever said that hunters should not have access to guns or take away guns from hunters. that is not at all what is being discussed today. and has nothing to do whether kids should be present. martha: i disagree. i think the message is sent to children, if they're raised in a home that has guns for security or hunting, that the message is that you're not like us and it is divisive to a certain extent. >> he is not talking about taking guns. >> hold on, it is pretty simple. let's not us
is really more an art than a science. a forest of beeping monitors can't always tell a doctor if a patient is truly unconscious. >> a way to inject a little current -- >> reporter: the new issue of "the atlantic" on stands today reports on what may be a breakthrough. a new approach that could monitor consciousness itself. >> you don't want the patient to move, to feel any pain, to have any memory. >> reporter: dr. giulio tonino's work looks at the brain. his theory? all the electrical signals -- sight, sound, pain, spreading across the brain -- creates consciousness. think of it as flipping a light switch, with light spilling into all the rooms of your brain. in surgery, anesthesia closes the doors, the lights, the electrical signals can't spread. that's when you are truly unconscious. tonino's new awareness monitor stimulates the brain with an electric current to see if it spreads. a truly unconscious brain would have no reaction. a brain conscious during surgery would. >> you're actually injecting current to the brain and finding out whether the various parts of the brain are talking to
. >> no single person can train all of the math and science teachers we need to-to-teach our children for the future. >> repeating the phrase we the people, he outlined priority autos we will rye respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would detray our children and future generations. >> reaction from the seer wherea club? >> it's important time for him to be leading on this issue. >> also talked about championing gay rights. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone uls els under the law. if we're truly created equal the love for one another must be equal as well. >> the head of the national center for lesbian rights said she was close to tear autos we felt we weren't in a back room maybe he'll talk to fuss no one is watching. >> the impact on republican who's fear any compromise to lead to a challenge from within their own ranks. saying change will depend less on president and democrats and more on moderate republican autos jeb bushes of the republican party, lamar alexander, on the podium with the pr
that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthquake country. that fact was demonstrated by the different experiences in death and destruction in haiti where earthquake resiliency is nonexistent and chile that took its playbook from california. that's why i'm optimistic that science and engineering calls make the coastal zone a safer place to live. there are important differences between the problem of earthquake hazards and coastal hazards. if we put aside those bumper stickers that say stop plate tectonics. humans have an effect on the rate and the intensity of earthquakes. on the other hand, we have increased coastal hazards by increasing the rate of wetland loss barrier island erosion and sea level rise. what this means in addressing coastal hazards we need to confront both mother nature and the enhanced risk from impacts. i would argue the philosophy we have to approach this with is exactly the same. scientists can make recommendations on issues such as what is the recurrence r
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. sfx: horn. ding. ding.. how long have you had your car insurance? how longave i had my car insurance? i don't know. eight, ten years. i couldn't tell ya' but things were a lot less expensive back then. if you're 50 or over you should take a new look at your auto insurance. you may be over paying. actually that makes a lot of sense. old policy. old rates. and thanks to your experience behind the wheel, you might save $350 by switching to the aarp auto insurance program from the hartford. plus, you'll get benefits that reward your driving record, like our promise that you won't be dropped. wait, you won't drop me, seriously? that's right, you won't be dropped. and, if you know anyone who's been dropped by their insurance company, you know that's a hassle you don't need. sfx: door closes. sfx: door closes. especially these days. plus you'll get recovercare, which helps you pay for everyday needs like housecleaning, lawn care and pet services if you're injured in an accident. so my auto insur
baldwin is doing great work examining the psychology and science behind it and has a presentation for us at 3:00 p.m. today and at 9:00, former governor of south carolina, mark sanford cheated and lied and wants to return to government. that is tonight on cnn with piers morgan. and stay tuned for a cnn special, the world according to lance is airing saturday night, 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern time. very busy. almost tastes like one of jack's cereals. fiber one. uh, forgot jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's for breakfast? um... try the number one! yeah, this is pretty good. [ male announcer ] over a third of a day's fiber. fiber one. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. >>> we all know that voting in florida last november was a real mess. some people waited up to seven hours to cast ballots. some if line until after 1:00 a.m. and it took weeks to certify the results. most of the problem came from a new law that dramatically cut back early voting hours. well, governor rick scott doesn't want the blame. on tuesday, he said, "it was not my bill. we've got to make changes, i agree. the legislature passed it. i didn't have anything to do with passing it. noth
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. "huckabee." ner, now, back to huckabee. >> we're back with larry and i want to remind you again, larry has written what you'll convinced is the most methodical, logical and rational understanding of this entire issue that i've ever seen, a long and thorough piece, we've got a link at mikehuckabee.com. and i want you to read it if you're rd in a lot mo-- interested in it in a lot more depth. the and nra proposed it and the president's plan seems more like armed police officers, resource officers, but you say if we had teachers who were trained in schools and were armed, they could prevent the kind of shootings, or at least maybe stop them before they get out of hand, like what happened at sandy hook. but that scares people, armed teachers. should they be afraid of that? >> no, and when i say armed teachers, i don't mean mandatory arming all teachers by no means, but most people don't realize that already in the state of utah, there are armed teachers b
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: continuing with our inauguration coverage go back to washington bring in bob woodward associated editor of the "the washington post." the author of the book: the price of politics. so, you think i'm wrong in saying that president obama is going to continue his big spending agenda in order to redistribute income no matter what the price the country pays? >> well, i think you hit on the right theme. social justice, he calls it equality. the question is how do you get there? and i think he knows in his head that you get there by mobilizing the economy, getting the engine going. if you think about it, the greatest social injustice is not being able to get a job. you have to get that unemployment number down. what i really think there was somewhat of a lost opportunity here. if he had given healing speech. supposed he had turned around, which would have been extraordinary speaker boehner, the republican leader of the house and said we're going to work together on these things we're going to fix my agenda and
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> it's sad, but true. lawmakers on the left say that those that disagree with the president's new anti-gun plans must be be racist, now listen to what congressman hank johnson told yesterday after the president announced he's going to bypass congress and put forward 23 executive actions. >> and just a minute ago, tha f n.r.a.'s true colors, a personal dislike of the president. why do you think, why do you think that is? >> well, first of all, first of all -- first of all he is black and as a black person being the president of these united states, that's something that they still cannot-- they still cannot get over. they couldn't get over the first election. they're still shocked at the second election, to use a pun, shell shocked. >> sean: and mr. johnson, i have a wild thought perhaps the n.r.a. disagrees with the president's policies because she represent an assault on the second amendment to the constitution. and more, new york congressma
, and advanced third world country. we're leading in science and technology, but not for the people. mass of a literary power. if you look at the condition that 85% of the country, it is terrible. >> i'm looking right now at those who are walking to their seats. timothy geithner, the outgoing treasury secretary. eric holder, the attorney general. their seats on the west front of the capital, about to witness the second inauguration of president obama. jenna napolitano's, the former governor of arizona, the secretary of homeland security. eric holder, the attorney general. comet, for example, on timothy geithner are. not only timothy geithner, but jack lew, who has been nominated by president obama to be the next secretary treasurer, and how that fits into the issue you're so deeply concerned about right now with minimum wage. >> a lot of liberal democrats filled with extraordinary help think, well, clinton's second term he does not have to worry. obama doesn't have to worry about re-election so it can be different. it is not one to be different. unless the people wake up in this country a
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> tequila, it's her weakness. she'll tell you anything. >> stephanie: all right. our computer has crashed. we have no music, nothing. that was a moment of silence from our relationship with jodie foster. all right. the president talking about the debt ceiling yesterday. >> obama: raising the debt ceiling does not authorize us to spend more. all it does is say that america will pay its bills, and we are not a dead beat nation. >> stephanie: there you go, and who joining us now, but the representative jan schakowsky from the great state of illinois. >> good morning, i understand you have been getting some calls from my friends in chicago. >> stephanie: yes. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: i thought the president put it very well, that you just cannot say it enough. the debt ceiling has nothing to do with budget cuts or anything going forward, it is paying bills that we have already racked up. >> that's so important. it's like getting your
and also to get a sense for whether interventions have worked. the national academy of science firearms looked at the data and a set of long as you use it with the appropriate care, acknowledge its limits, and on deily use the data that has been generated from the jurisdictions that are comprehensively tracing all of the firearms so you have a reasonable sample of gone stark recovered from the streets in the crime that you can use that data to do some generalizations. as both jon and daniel have discussed new guns are disproportionately recovered in crime. this is an important indicator that you have a flow of guns going from the legal commerce into the hands of criminals and many of these guns when you look at who the first purchaser wasn't revealed that possessor was coming you have a change of hand suggesting that not only is it moving quickly from the dealer onto the streets and it's the recovery of law enforcement and crime but also changing hands very rapidly as well. beyond the sales volume as he was suggesting some licensed dealers are disproportionately frequent sources of fire
heart, brain and vascular system. not just for display, but for study. >> it is science. and it's art. >> reporter: cardiologists use the models to simulate blood flow. medical students use them for practice and medical manufacturers can techt the latest products. >> our models can be anywhere from a couple hundred dollars all the way up to our full man model that we currently make, and that can go up to $25,000. >> reporter: the company's founder, gary farlow, started making glass toys and trimpths 30 years ago in the san francisco bay area. his skill and big ideas turned into a game changing idea. >> the aha moment was when he found out that he could turn typically a metal part that was made in the medical industry into glass and he could produce it for way cheaper than anyplace else. >> farlow passed away last year but his legacy as an artist and entrepreneur lives on. >> we make something that's beautiful. it's art. it's hand crafted. and it's actually used for something that could potentially save someone's life. that makes me feel good that i'm involved in helping people. what a
baldwin examines why we cheat, the psychology and science behind it. that's at 3:00 p.m. today eastern. >> we talked about it a lot. i say this is a problem within the culture of sports, and they need to change it in order for the players not to feel like this is something they have to do in order to be competitive. >> i agree with that. but i also think you cannot exonerate or allow individuals to get away with it. >> consequences. >> if you are traveling today, playing by the rules or cheating, check your flight because there's a huge swath of moistu moisture. >> no cheating in weather. no cheating in weather at all. we're looking at rain in most areas, look what's happening. we have some snow through parts of mississippi. it's coming down in some locations. really for the south, some locations could pick up two to four inches of snowfall. it's going to start in mississippi, and then spread over towards the east a bit more as we go into late morning as well as into the afternoon. right now just rain effecting areas like birmingham, huntsville and atlanta. expect delays there. for atl
soldiers could have met the forces of facism or communism with muskettes and militias. no math or science teachers can teach all the children they need to equipped them. research labs that can bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now more than ever we must do these things together as one nation and one people. this generation of americans has been tested by crisis that is steal our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless. for, we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. for, we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america tlifs when every person can find independen
, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. i hate getting up in the morning. i love bread. i love cheese. did i say
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> this will be difficult. there will be pundits and politicians and special interest lobbyists publicly warning of a tyrannical all-out assault on liberty. not because that's true but because they want to gin up fear or higher ratings or revenue for themselves. the only way we will be able to change is if their audience, their constituents, their membership says this time must be different. that this time we must do something to protect our communities and our kids. weapons designed for the theater of war have no place in a movie theater. a majority of americans agree with us on this. and by the way, so did ronald reagan, one of the staunchest defenders of the second amendment, who wrote to congress in 1994 urging them -- this is ronald reagan speaking -- urging them to listen to the american public and to the law enforcement community and support a ban on the further manufacture of military-style assault weapons. >> all right. welcome back to "morning joe." a live look at the whit
for years. is science cology a cult? >> of course it is. of course it is. a system of belief, you got these folks inside this fortress who won't look out, won't look at any criticism and can't bear to -- any investigation and think that everyone is against them. how would you describe that? it's a cult. of course it is. >> well, larry ryan is a pulitzer-prize wing author, his new book is "going clear, scientology, hollywood and the prison of belief." good morning to you, larry. >> good morning. >> pick up with paul haggis left off. he calls scientology a cult. based on your reporting, is that what you would call it? >> i don't use those words, only one opinion that matters about whether it's religion or a cult and that's the irs and they made that decision in 1993 in the nation of 2400 lawsuits from the church and church members. >> concluding it is a religion? >> yes. >> let's talk about what you found in your book. you say you interviewed more than 200 people you looked at thousands of pages of documents. what is the most troublesome practice you say you uncovered through your resea
states, to establish post offices and post roads, to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries, mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. bera. mr. bera:to constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court, to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the law of nations, to declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water, to raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years, mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from virginia, mr. griffith. mr. griffith:to provide and maintain a navy, to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces, to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions, to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such par
may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it! >> all right. so, for david maraniss, for some inside the echo chamber, there might have been some concern that there wasn't enough reaching out by the president to republicans on spending, on fiscal issues. but isn't this speech, the second inaugural, more to lay down markers for even generations to come, and then we have the state of the union, where perhaps he can address some of the short, and i mean, in the grand scheme of things, the short-term issues that our country faces. >> i think that's true. and i also think that this speech was ideological, but he's a pragmatic president. and so i think that not everything that he said in the speech -- you know, he said that it's going to be imperfect. the solutions will be imperfect. he's not going to try to please every constituency.
. we'll restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's use and lower its cost. >> here we are four years later. why not come back to the dubliner? all you did too. my, lord. the line goes around the block. a wonderful, joyful crowd. thank you all for coming. joining us now with the politico playbook, the politico executive director jim. >> i'm always a dose of sunshine in the morning. you guys were talking about ted cruz and his comments on gun control. i think what people need to realize, ted cruz is a mainstream republican with this senate and this house. his views, he's not on the conserveative edge of the party. that is the party. when you think about the budget, think about gun control -- >> saying the president exploited the death of 6 and 7-year-olds within minutes? >> i think a lot of republicans wouldn't say it like that but they'd say something similar. >> he's on "meet the press" for his first time. this is his introduction. he makes a political attack that you would expect in a campaign for dogcatcher in the b
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)